New Yorkers have reacted with fury to a new etiquette guide – including 25 per cent at restaurants and 20 per cent at coffee shops, coffee carts and even bodegas. 

The 140 etiquette rules, published in New York Magazine’s  – which infamously  – are intended as a guide on how to deal ‘politely’ with social situations

The magazine asks readers ‘Do you know how to grow magic mushrooms to behave?Are you sure?’ – with sections covering friends and lovers, strangers, going out and staying in, tipping, work, the City, parenting and texting.

The rules were put together by asking people about situations that typically put them on edge – and as a result the writers came up with ‘rigid, but not entirely inflexible rules’. 

The tip guidance section in particular prompted controversy, with one Twitter user calling the rules ‘baffling’ and another saying they were a ‘joke’ – while a third said they had been put off tipping completely. 

The tip guidance section in particular prompted controversy, with one Twitter user calling the rules ‘baffling’ and another saying they were a ‘joke’

From a new expectation of a 25 per cent tip at restaurants to a 10 per cent tip when picking up a takeaway, the new rules caused a debate with New York residents.  

At restaurants, the guide begins, people should be tipping 20 to 25 per cent ‘whether you liked the service or not’.  

It adds that anything under 20 per cent is rude and that, if you have more disposable income, you should be tipping more. 


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